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Busting the misconceptions about Health and Social Care courses!

 

There are a lot of common misconceptions surrounding health and social care courses. Some think they are only for students who want to be doctors or nurses, but that is not the case. There are a lot of different career paths that you can take with a Higher National Diploma (HND), BSc, or BA (Hons) in any of the Health and Social Care areas. Below, we will set the record straight on some of the most common myths about the Allied Health subject area.  

 Myth 1: Can I become a nurse with an Allied Health degree?  

The truth is that there are actually a lot of different career paths that you can take with a BSc (Hons) in Health and Social Care with a Foundation Year degree. Healthcare is not always about becoming a doctor or a nurse, Allied Health offers a huge range of careers such as social worker, a counsellor, wellbeing, physiotherapy, or even teaching. Our courses cover psychology, sociology, public health, sports and exercise science, nutrition, sports management, and more.  

Our Health and Social Care courses open many career options for you and can enable you to go on to do many different things. However, becoming a nurse will require a different degree, such as a BA degree in Nursing, or a BSc (Hons) in Nursing. If this option is of interest to you, it can still be taken as an extra qualification as another degree, after you have completed a Health and Social Care degree. 

 Myth 2: All health and social care courses are the same.  

 Again, this is not the case. There are various health and social care courses available at all levels to suit anyone, whether at the start of their studies or further along. You can always choose the one that is right for you, and each is unique. For instance, with a BSc (Hons) in Health and Social Care Course, you would gain the fundamentals to work in a wide range of statutory, voluntary, and independent settings that might include local authority teams, health promotion projects, refugee, and asylum service hospitals, sheltered accommodation, hospices and day centres, and residential care units.  

Studying for a BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science with Foundation Year would cover physical activity and sports and various career options linked to coaching and helping athletes recover from injury to competing in international events. The modules cover areas such as the physiology of exercise, sports biomechanics, and environmental physiology. So, no matter your interests, there is sure to be a health and social care course that is right for you, but they are never the same.   

 Myth 3: Health and social care courses are easy.  

Health and social care courses can be thorough and challenging but also rewarding. Health and social care can be vocational, so it is a natural fit for those seeking a career in these sectors. As an Allied Health student, you will learn a lot about yourself and other people, as well as the industry, and you will come out of it with the skills and knowledge you need to pursue the career you want. There are a variety of different career paths that you can take with a BSc (Hons) in Health and Social Care with a Foundation Year degree.   

So, when looking at whether a Health and Social Care course is right for you, keep in mind that not everything that is presumed regarding the industry is accurate. With a variety of career options and future pathways, there is always an option for you, whether you want to be a social worker or a physiotherapist.  

If you are considering enrolling in one of these courses, we encourage you to do some research to find the one that is right for you. Researching what the individual modules cover, and whether these align with a future career that you imagine will allow you to tailor your course to what really interests and excites you, allowing you to get the most out of your degree.